[USC Home Page][USC Home Page] UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH CAROLINA SCHOOL OF LAW
South Carolina's Flagship University
 EVENTS DIRECTORY MAP VIP GIVE TODAY

Regulatory Pathfinder
for Coastal Development in South Carolina

Deposition of Dredged Material

  1. Upland disposal of dredged material is always preferred to wetlands disposal.
  2. Dredged material shall not be deposited in vegetated wetlands and mudflats unless there is no feasible alternative.
  3. If other alternatives exist dredged materials are not allowed to be deposited into wetlands.
  4. Open water or deep water disposal are alternatives if highland alternatives are not available. However, these options should only be considered after careful consultation with OCRM and other relevant State and Federal agencies.
  5. If the dredged material contains high levels of toxic material it must be disposed of with extreme caution. These materials will never be disposed of in wetland areas. These materials can only be disposed of highland areas that are lined and diked with impervious materials. Open water ocean dumping of these materials will only be allowed when maximum safety has been demonstrated and OCRM and other appropriate State and Federal agencies have reviewed the plan.
  6. To minimize erosion dikes surrounding disposal areas should be shaped and immediately vegetated, with outfalls positioned to empty into non-wetland areas.
  7. Future disposal sites will be reviewed on a case-by-case basis.
  8. Existing disposal sites shall be utilized to the fullest extent possible when possible, including raising the height of the embankment to increase the capacity.
  9. Temporal aspects of spoil deposition must be considered. These include, but are not limited to, impacts on spawning, fish migrations, shellfish harvesting, waterfowl nesting and wintering areas, and mosquito control. Possible adverse impacts of various alternative sites on the public health and welfare, including critical fish and wildlife areas, must also be given attention.
  10. In no case will approval for dredging activities be given prior to satisfactory disposal sites being acquired.

S.C. Code Regs. 30-12(I)

Last Updated October 29, 2010

ABOUT THIS PATHFINDER

This project was supported through a generous grant from the South Carolina Sea Grant Consortium. The principal investigator is Professor Kim Diana Connolly at the University of South Carolina School of Law. Two law students, Keith Bartlett and Valerie Cochran, provided invaluable work toward project completion. Technical assistance with web design was provided by USC School of Law webmaster Tobias Brasier. Broken links should be reported to lawweb@law.sc.edu. This website is NOT intended as legal advice, and particularized analysis by professionals should be sought wherever appropriate.

MENU
»
»
»
»
»